Tag: Tungsten

Application of Tungsten

What is Tungsten ?

Tungsten is a chemical element with the chemical symbol W and atomic number 74. The word tungsten comes from the Swedish language tung sten directly translatable to heavy stone. Tungsten is a very hard, dense, silvery-white, lustrous metal that tarnishes in air, forming a protective oxide coating. In powder form tungsten is gray in color.

The metal has the highest melting point of all metals, and at temperatures over 1650 oC also has the highest tensile strength. Pure tungsten is ductile, and tungsten wires, even of a very small diameter, have a very high tensile strength.

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Tungsten

What is Tungsten Metal ?

In 1779 Peter Woulfe deduced the existence of a new element - Tungsten - from his analysis of the mineral wolframite (an iron manganese tungstate mineral). Tungsten was isolated as tungstic oxide (WO3) in 1781 by Carl W. Scheele from the mineral scheelite (calcium tungstate). However he did not have a suitable furnace to reduce the oxide to the metal.

Tungsten Ball

Tungsten was finally isolated by Fausto and Juan Jose de Elhuyar in 1783 by reduction acidified wolframite with charcoal. The element name comes from the Swedish words ‘tung sten’, meaning heavy stone. The chemical symbol, W, comes from the original name of the element, Wolfram.

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